Joanne M Belovich, Ph.D.
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 Title: Chair and Professor
 Dept: Chemical & Biomedical Engineering
 Office: FH 456
 Phone: 216-687-3502
 Email: J.BELOVICH@csuohio.edu
 Address: 2121 Euclid Ave. FH 456, Cleveland, OH 44115

Courses Taught

Publications


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Research Keywords:
Accoustic Fields in Bioprocessing and Bioseparations, ultrasound, Bone Tissue Engineering, Transport Properties of Bone, animal cell culture engineering, Algae, Biodiesel, Biofuel, Cell separations
 
Education:
Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 1991
B.S., Chemical Engineering/Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 1985
 
Brief Bio:
My research interests include the following:
Bone tissue engineering
Large-scale algae processing for biofuels
 
Honors and Awards:
Administrative Faculty Merit Award, 2001.
Tau Beta Pi, National Honorary Engineering Society.
Faculty Merit Award, 2008
Faculty Merit Award, 2011
 
Research Interests:
Research Facilities:
Research is conducted in the Cell Culture Lab in the Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Department, with equipment including laminar flow hood, incubators, microscopes (including fluorescent), fully-instrumented (2) 1-liter bioreactors, glucose-lactate analyzer, ELISA plate reader, UV/Vis spectrophotometer, autoclave, -70C freezer, centrifuge, and other instrumentation specific to the research projects. Equipment for fermentation (shaker bath, 3-liter fermentor) are available in the separate Fermentation Lab.

Bone Tissue Engineering
In collaboration with The Cleveland Clinic, we are developing methods to engineer bone tissue ex vivo.  We are characterizing the transport properties (hydraulic permeability and effective diffusivities) of native bone tissue and using this information to design scaffolds with similar properties.  We are investigating bone cell attachment and proliferation on scaffolds with various processing methods.

Algae for Biodiesel
Large-scale cultivation of algae is a potential major source of biofuels that does not divert farmland from fuel and that also mitigates carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. One of the most energy-intensive steps in the process is the algae dewatering process.  We are developing methods, for separation of the algae from the perfusion fluid and extraction of the oil from the algae, that are low in energy use and manufacturing cost.
 
Professional Affiliations:
American Institute of Chemical Engineers
American Chemical Society