John M Masnovi
J_MASNOVI.jpg
 Title: Professor
 Dept: Chemistry
 Office: SR 367
 Phone: 216-687-2469
 Email: J.MASNOVI@csuohio.edu
 Address: 2121 Euclid Ave. SR 367, Cleveland, OH 44115

Courses Taught

Publications

Publication link


Faculty Only:
Update Profile
 

 
Research Keywords:
electron transfer chemistry, organic, bio-organic, organometallic chemistry
 
Education:
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1982
M.S., University of Notre Dame, 1977
B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1975
 
Brief Bio:
Department of Chemistry, Cleveland State University, 1985-
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Houston 1984-1985
Postdoctoral Fellow, Indiana University, 1982-1983

Recently we have examined the theories of gravitation and de Broglie waves to reformulate quantum mechanical behavior for a particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom.

Experimental projects are in the areas of organic, bio-organic and organometallic chemistry. We are interested in how reactions occur, particularly those which involve the intermediacy of reactive species, and we are actively investigating the structures and properties of compounds with high energy content.

One of the specific projects we are pursuing involves the mechanism of oxygen transfer by cytochrome P-450 model compounds. We have discovered that oxometal analogues of the active site of cytochrome P-450 react with unsaturated hydrocarbons by forming organometallic intermediates before release of final oxidized products. Related intermediates potentially play a role in reactions of the enzyme with oral contraceptives which lead to catalytic deactivation. Our group currently is studying reactions of other organic substrates with the model compounds to decide whether this mechanism is general for oxidation of unsaturated compounds by oxometal complexes.

Another project in our group involves conversion of the energy of light into chemical energy and electricity. We are using photochemistry to prepare exotic molecules and materials with high energy content, such as one of our synthesis targets, hexaprismane. Hexaprismane (C12H12) can be considered to be a totally sigma-bonded dimer of benzene. Light also can be used to ionize molecules and generate electrical charges. We are investigating conditions under which charges generated photochemically in organic molecules will separate efficiently. Such a process is important in several applications, including photocopying devices and photosynthesis in green plants. Electron transfer and charge separation is believed to be central to a wide range of chemical reactions, such as electrophilic substitutions, nucleophilic displacements, oxidations, reductions, even acid-base reactions and enzyme-catalyzed reactions under biological conditions. Application of electron transfer chemistry is being pursued in the areas of organic synthesis (photoremovable protecting groups in carbohydrate synthesis), solar energy conversion, photoconducting polymers and nonlinear optical materials, measurement of kinetic acidities, and solvolysis.

Another area of research involves the exploration of novel routes to the formation of carbosilane and metal chalcone preceramic polymers.  These polymers are used for production of high-temperature ceramic materials and devices of interest in the space and aerotech industry in collaboration with NASA Lewis Research Center.
 
Research Interests:
Our principle research projects are in the areas of organic, bio-organic and organometallic chemistry. We are interested in how reactions occur, particularly those which involve the intermediacy of reactive species, and we are actively investigating the structures and properties of compounds with high energy content.

One of the specific projects we are pursuing involves the mechanism of oxygen transfer by cytochrome P-450 model compounds. We have discovered that oxometal analogues of the active site of cytochrome P-450 react with unsaturated hydrocarbons by forming organometallic intermediates before release of final oxidized products. Related intermediates potentially play a role in reactions of the enzyme with oral contraceptives which lead to catalytic deactivation. Our group currently is studying reactions of other organic substrates with the model compounds to decide whether this mechanism is general for oxidation of unsaturated compounds by oxometal complexes.

Another project in our group involves conversion of the energy of light into chemical energy and electricity. We are using photochemistry to prepare exotic molecules and materials with high energy content, such as one of our synthesis targets, hexaprismane. Hexaprismane (C12H12) can be considered to be a totally sigma-bonded dimer of benzene. Light also can be used to ionize molecules and generate electrical charges. We are investigating conditions under which charges generated photochemically in organic molecules will separate efficiently. Such a process is important in several applications, including photocopying devices and photosynthesis in green plants. Electron transfer and charge separation is believed to be central to a wide range of chemical reactions, such as electrophilic substitutions, nucleophilic displacements, oxidations, reductions, even acid-base reactions and enzyme-catalyzed reactions under biological conditions. Application of electron transfer chemistry is being pursued in the areas of organic synthesis (photoremovable protecting groups in carbohydrate synthesis), solar energy conversion, photoconducting polymers and nonlinear optical materials, measurement of kinetic acidities and solvolysis.

A third area of research in our group involves the exploration of novel routes to the formation of carbosilane preceramic polymers using transition metal catalysts. These polymers are used for production of high-temperature ceramic materials and devices of interest in the space and aerotech industry. We are currently studying the formation of oxide and non-oxide polymers for use as coatings of ceramic fibers in collaboration with NASA Lewis Research Center.