Michael Kalafatis
M_KALAFATIS.jpg
 Title: Professor
 Dept: Chemistry
 Office: SR 370
 Phone: 216-687-2460
 Email: M.KALAFATIS@csuohio.edu
 Address: 2121 Euclid Ave. SR 370, Cleveland, OH 44115

Courses Taught

Publications


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Research Keywords:
Thrombosis, haemostasis, coagulation factors, factor V, factor X, prothrombin, prothrombinase, thrombin, platelets, endothelial cells, kinase, phosphorylation, signal transduction, cancer, cell division, apoptosis, kinase, lupus anticoagulant
 
Education:
Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Paris (Paris, VI Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris France), 1989
M.S., Biochemistry, University of Paris (Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris France), 1984
B.S., Biochemistry, University of Paris (Paris VII, Paris France), 1983
B.S., Human Biology, University of Paris (Paris VII, Paris France), 1983
 
Brief Bio:
Dr. Kalafatis obtained a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Paris (PARIS IV, Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris France) in 1989.  From 1989 to 1994 he was a postodoctoral fellow in Blood Coagulation Research in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Vermont where he worked with Dr. Ken Mann.  In 1994, he was appointed Research Assistant Professor in the same Department.  In 1998 he was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Cleveland State University.  In 2002, he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure. In 2005, he was promoted to full Professor in the same Department at Cleveland State University.  Dr. Kalafatis is an international scholar and active researcher in translational research relating to blood coagulation, thrombosis, cancer, and apoptosis. His work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Heart Association (AHA).  

Cleveland State University introduced a new Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease (GRHD) in October of 2008, bringing its professors together in a collaborative environment.  Dr. Kalafatis is a member of the planning committee of the center and a leading researcher for the university and the GRHD Center. He has been effectively studying the biochemistry of blood coagulation and thrombosis for more the 20 years.  He was one of the first scientists in the world to identify the biochemical and molecular defect in factor VLEIDEN, the leading cause of deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

Work performed in Dr. Kalafatis' laboratory at Cleveland State University the last ten years, has resulted in the identification of a small peptide from factor V that can be used as a potent anticoagulant. Research is ongoing in this promising direction.

Dr. Kalafatis laboratory is also actively involved in cancer research.  Over $5 billion is invested annually by the Federal government alone in research to cure cancer,  and a significant number of researchers are working tirelessly to think about what to do with these abnormal cells.  How do they develop?  Are we born with them or do they grow over time?  Can you get rid of them?  Can you stop them from turning deadly?  The questions are endless.  Dr. Kalafatis believes he has found an answer and that it is possible to kill abnormal cancer cells without damaging the surrounding healthy cells.  Dr. Kalafatis has discovered a unique application for a substance he calls CancerX, that has consistently shown promise in extinguishing cancer.  Initially, Dr. Kalafatis tested his hypothesis on seven different types of cancer cells in vitro:  leukemia cells, breast cancer cells, skin cancer cells, renal cancer cells, brain cancer cells, and prostrate cancer cells.   In all seven cases, CancerX killed the abnormal cancer cells.  He then moved to in vivo testing (using laboratory mice).  In collaboration with scientists from the Taussig Cancer Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Kalafatis has achieved reduction and eradication of seven different types of human cancer cells implanted in mice (xenografts).  More recently, experiments using glioblastoma cells, demonstrated that the brain tumor growth was substantially reduced in mice xenografts within 20 days of administering the drug directly into the tumor. In all cases CancerX killed the cancer cells, but it did not kill the mice and did not affect the surrounding tissues. This means that the synthetic chemical is non-toxic, killing the cancer cell but not impacting healthy cells.  

Dr. Kalafatis, who has been researching cancer antidotes for the past four years, submitted his findings to the Developmental Therapeutic Program (DTP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the NIH to independently substantiate his evidence.  The first two rounds of tests achieved successful results on 52 different strains of human cancer cells.
 
Honors and Awards:
Distinguished Faculty Award For Research, Cleveland State University 2005
Established Investigator of the American Heart Association       2000
Finalist for the Louis N. Katz Basic Science Research Prize of the American Heart Assoc 1995
Research Fellowship; Philippe Foundation (Paris/New York) 1989
Research Fellowship; INSERM (Nat Instit of Health and Med Research, Paris, France) 1988
Research Fellowship; Singer Polignac Foundation (Paris, France) 1987
Research Fellowship; Association Claude Bernard (Paris, France) 1984-1986
 
Research Interests:
Biochemistry of blood coagulation and thrombosis; identification of binding sites for protein-protein interaction; regulation of blood clotting and thrombosis at the surface of platelets and endothelial cell.

Chemistry and biochemistry of cancer; phosphorylation and carcinogenesis; identification of specific proteins involved in the control of cell proliferation.

Phosphorylation of blood clotting proteins by platelet kinases and significance of phosphorylation; signal transduction; identification of the molecular defect in patients with blood coagulation disorders.
 
Teaching Areas:
General Biochemistry 301 (fall) (University of Vermont):
Graduate course, 30-35 students, 3 times (one hour)/week, fall of every year (1996-1998).
Team teaching.  In charge of teaching the first half of the fall semester.

Design administer and proctor the Biochemistry Department¿s Cumulative Examination for graduate students at the University of Vermont (1-2 times/year) (1996-1998).

Biochemistry CHM 402/502 (fall) (Cleveland State University):
Undergraduate/ Graduate course, 40-45 students, 2 times (1 hour 30 min)/week, one semester (2000-2006).
In charge of teaching the entire Biochemistry course.

Biochemistry CHM 402/502 (fall) and 403/503 (spring) (Cleveland State University):
Undergraduate/ Graduate course, 40-45 students, 2 times (1 hour 15 min)/week, two semesters (2007-present).
In charge of teaching the entire Biochemistry course.

Advanced Biochemistry I CHM 653/753 (fall) and Advanced Biochemistry II CHM 654/754 (spring) (Cleveland State University):
Graduate course, 15-20 students, 2 times (two hours)/week, two semesters (1999-2005).
In charge of teaching the entire Biochemistry course, both semesters.

Biotechonology Techniques CHM 655/755 (spring) (Cleveland State University):
Graduate laboratory course, 10-15 students, once (4 hours)/week, spring of every year (2000-2008).
Team teaching.  In charge of teaching in the second half of spring semester:  PCR amplification and application to the clinical diagnosis (Factor VLEIDEN), proteins and enzymes, protein purification and analysis, immunology and immune techniques.

BIO 106 (spring and/or fall) Human Biology in Health and Disease (Cleveland State University):  
Undergraduate course exclusively for army veterans 15-20 students, 2 times (1 hours)/week (2007-present)
In charge of teaching the entire course.

College Chemistry II CHM 252 (summer) (Cleveland State University):
Undergraduate course, 35-40 students, 5 times (1 hour 15 min)/week, summer semester (2002-2005)
In charge of teaching the entire course.

College Chemistry Lab II (CHM 257) (summer) (Cleveland State University):
Undergraduate laboratory course, 20-25 students, 3 times (2 hours)/week, summer semester (2002-2005)
In charge of teaching the entire laboratory course.

College Chemistry II CHM 252 (spring) (Cleveland State University):
Undergraduate course, 50-60 students, 3 times (45 min)/week, spring semester (2003-2005)
In charge of teaching the entire course.
 
Professional Affiliations:
American Heart Association (Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Council)
American Society of Hematology
International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (International Advisory Board)
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
American Association for the Advancement of Sciences
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
 
Professional Experience:
2005-present Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

2000-present Adjunct Staff
Department of Molecular Cardiology
J.J. Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
The Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio

2008-present Adjunct Staff
Taussig Cancer Institute
Department of Translational Hematology & Oncology Research
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio

2008-present Member Planning Committee
Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease (GRHD)
Cleveland State University, College of Science
Cleveland, Ohio

2003-present Adjunct Professor
Department of Biological Geological and Environmental Sciences
Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

2002-2005 Associate Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

2003-2005 Associate Chair and Graduate Program Director
Department of Chemistry
Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

1999-2005 Member, Graduate Committee
Department of Chemistry
Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

1998-2002 Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
Cleveland State University
Cleveland, Ohio

1998-2000 Consultant
Department of Molecular Cardiology
J.J. Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
The Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland, Ohio

1994-1998 Research Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine
University of Vermont
Burlington, Vermont

1993-1994 Postdoctoral Fellow Coagulation Research (5T32HL007594-09)
Advisor: Dr. Kenneth Mann
Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine
University of Vermont
Burlington, Vermont

1989-1993 Postdoctoral Associate in Coagulation Research
Advisor: Dr. Kenneth Mann
Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine
University of Vermont
Burlington, Vermont

1984-1989 Graduate student (Ph.D. Dissertation)
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Meyer
Unité 143, Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire
Hopital de Bicètre, Paris France

1983-1984 Graduate student (Master Dissertation)
Advisor: Dr. Dominique Meyer
Unité 143, Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire
Hopital de Bicètre, Paris France
 
University Service:
a) Post Doctoral Fellows:
Lisam Sanjukumar Singh, Ph.D. 2001-2003

b) Graduate students (M. Kalafatis, advisor):
Daniel O. Beck, MS, Clinical Chemistry, CSU 1999-2002

Paul Pavicic Jr., MS, Clinical Chemistry, CSU 2001-2003

Mauro Tiso, Ph.D. Molecular Medicine, CSU 2002-2006
Predoctoral fellowship from the American Heart Association

Evrim Erdogan, Ph.D., Clin. Chem/Mol. Medicine CSU 2001-2006
Predoctoral fellowship from the American Heart Association

Sam Mazzei, Ph. D. Molecular Medicine, CSU 2001-2007
Predoctoral fellowship from the Molecular Medicine Program Sept 2002-Aug 2004

Alieta Ciocea, Ph.D. Clinical Chemistry, CSU 2003-2007

Tivadar Orban, Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Chemistry, CSU 2002-2008
Predoctoral fellowship from the Molecular Medicine Program

Melissa Blum, Ph.D., Clinical Chem/Molecular Med., CSU 2004-2007

Michael Bukys, Ph.D. Candidate Clinical Chem/Molecular Med., CSU 2003-2008
Predoctoral fellowship from the Molecular Medicine Program
Predoctoral fellowship from the American Heart Association

Jamila Hirbawi, Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Chemistry, CSU2 004-
Graduate Research Supplement from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NIH)
Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NIH)

Oruba Abdallah, Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Chemistry, CSU, GAAN Felowship 2007-
Phong, Feng, Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Chemistry, CSU, 2007-
Mohammed Hannan, Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Chemistry, CSU, GAAN Felowship 2007-

c) Graduate Student Committees:
Joseph Lupica, Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Chemistry, CSU 2001-2008
Haosen Zhang, Ph.D. Biochemical Engineering, CSU 2000-2003
Beatrix Budy, Ph.D. Clinical Chem/Molecular Med, CSU 1999-2003
Richard E. Chiott, Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Vermont 1996-2003
Jay Silveira, Ph.D. Biochemistry, University of Vermont 1995-2001
Rodney M. Camire, Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Vermont 1994-1998
Matthew F. Hockin, Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Vermont 1994-1998
Kelly L. Hayes, MD/Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Vermont 1993-1997

d) Undergraduate students:
Michael Ungham, CSU Spring 1999
Robert Dura, CSU Spring 1999
Michael Ungham; Undergraduate fellowship from the American Heart Association, Summer 2000
Katalin Szabo; Undergraduate fellowship from the American Heart Association, Summer 2002
Amanda Wilson; Undergraduate fellowship from the American Heart Association, Summer 2004
Nicole Reddout; Undergraduate fellowship from the American Heart Association,Summer 2005
John Vaughn; Engage Learning CSU, Summer 2008

e) High School students:
Ginelle Nelson, University of Vermont, Summer 1996
Robin Hopkins, Alexa Booker, University of Vermont, Summer 1997
Alexandra Wang, Graduate of Shaker Heights High School, Summer 2005
 
Professional Service:
Grant review committees
Member of Peer Review Committee Roster of the AHA, Ohio Valley Affiliate 1999-2003
Ad Hoc Member of the American Heart Association, National Center 2002-2003
Ad Hoc Member, Florida Dept of Health (with the American Cancer Society) 2001-present
National Institutes of Health, NHLBI Program Project Ad Hoc Review Committee 2003-2007
National Institutes of Health, NHLBI Ad Hoc Review Committee 2005-present
National Institutes of Health, NHLBI Member Review Committee  SBIR/STTR 2005-present
Member American Heart Association, National Center, Thrombosis 2007-present
Member Peer Review Committee Roster of the AHA, Ohio Valley Affiliate Thrombosis 2007-present

Abstract reviewer
International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 2002-2006, 2009
American Heart Association 2003-2007

Journal reviews
The Journal of Biological Chemistry; Biochemistry; The Journal of Clinical Investigation; Blood; Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology; Thrombosis and Haemostasis; The Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine; Protein Science, The Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis; Thrombosis Research
 
Community Service:
In 2006, Dr. Schupp and Dr. Kalafatis established the SERV program at CSU.  The SERV (Supportive Education for the Returning Veteran) program is aimed at helping veterans to transition from the veteran status to the student status.  This program is unique in the country. Our program is unique and offers veteran only classes for the first year.  The approximate timeline for the creation of the SERV program is as follows:

The idea for the SERV program came in the fall of 2006 when a Chemistry student from a Kosovo military operation discussed the difficulties of transitioning from the military to civilian life with Dr. Schupp.  

Received university backing in May 2007 (Board of Trustees letter)

Received State of Ohio funding ($100,000) in May 2007

Started welcoming veterans to CSU campus Fall semester 2007

First set of `vets only classes (14 total)- Spring Semester 2008; taught BIO 106

SERV story airs on NPR Jan 28 2008

SERV Act of 2008 introduced in the senate February 2008

First class of vets only classes completed May 2008, 71% retention rate

"Operation Transition" article appears "Inside Higher Ed" July 10 2008

SERV act passed as part of the Higher Education Act of 2008, "Centers for Veteran Student Success on Campus"

Pentagon Channel visits CSU for taping of their education program including SERV (September 2008)

Four SERV classes for Fall 2008; 25 students total->80% retention rate

Quoted  in the Sunday New York Times, Nov 2 2008, "Combat to College"

Received Wal-Mart award, $100,000 from American Council on Education (ACE) Nov 11th 2008

Pentagon Channel airs SERV story, Jan 1 2009

Fall 2008; first Fall semester completed, 23/25 go on to spring semester (92% retention rate);

Jan 29-Feb 10-our SERV program is on the front page of the VA (Washington) website

Feb 2008 article about our SERV program appears on the Department of Defense (DOD, Washington) homepage
 
Research Grants:
1. July 1994-June1997 American Heart Association:  Grant-in-Aid (National Center)
(Ref. 94017990)
Characterization of platelet derived kinase(s) (Total cost: $120,000).

2. July 1996-June 1997 American Heart Association: Vermont Affiliate Grant-in-Aid
(Ref. 9606277S)
Essential Regions for factor Va Cofactor Functions (Total cost: $20,000)

3. January 1997-December 1998 National Science Foundation:  NSF/EPSCoR
Regulation of blood clotting by protein kinase C  (Total cost: $40,000)

4. June 1997-Dec 1998 Vermont EPSCoR Receptor-Mediated Signal and Biotech Cluster
Cell Signaling and thrombosis in patients with lupus anticoagulant (Total cost: ~$21,500)

5. May 2000-June 2002 Cleveland State University: EEFRD grant
The Effects of Periodontopathogens on Blood Coagulation Factors (Total cost: $10,000)

6. Jan 2000-Dec 2003 American Heart Association: Established Investigator Award
(Ref. 0040100N)
Critical regions for factor Va cofactor activity (Total cost: $300,000)

7. May 2002-June 2004 Cleveland State University: EEFRD grant
Periodontal Pathogens and Blood Coagulation (Total cost: $15,000)

8. May 2003-December 2004 Cleveland State University: Presidents Initiative Award
Regulation of Gene Expression in Disease: Research and Education (Total cost: $50,000)

9. Oct 2004-Sept 2005 National Institutes of Health (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst)
(Ref. R41 HL-075912; PI from Cleveland State University)
Thrombin Formation Inhibitors (Total cost: $145,000)
Phase I STTR through Curragh Chemistry, Inc. (Cleveland OH, Dr. James Phillips PI)


RESEARCH GRANT SUPPORT (M. Kalafatis, Principal Investigator Active)
10. May 2004-April 2009 National Institutes of Health (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst, Ref. 5R01 HL-073343)
Functional Domains of Coagulation Factor V (Total cost: $1,059,171

11. May 2008-June 2010 Cleveland State University: EEFRD grant
Identification of nuclear proteins responsible for cell proliferation (Total cost: $15,000)